Ministry Eagle River Memorial Hospital Announces Simulation Open House

Ministry Eagle River Memorial Hospital located at 201 Hospital Road in Eagle River is hosting a community open house to introduce our Simulation Family on Thursday, August 25 from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. The event is FREE to the public and will be held in the Medical Arts Building.

Through the generous donations of the Woodruff, Minocqua, and Eagle River communities, and support from the Howard Young Foundation, Ministry Howard Young Health Care purchased a high fidelity simulation “family,” including adults, infant, and pediatric simulators.

High fidelity simulation provides the latest in technology driven educational simulation for clinicians by mimicking the physiologic responses of a human being. High fidelity simulation uses a computer, embedded within a mannequin, which is programmed to react in different situations just as a human being would.
High fidelity simulators can be programmed to breathe abnormally, have heart rate and blood pressure readings, and mimic cardiac arrest situations among many other features.

“Providing an environment where our clinical staff can learn is very important to the overall safety of our patients,” said Laura Magstadt Director of Nursing and Operations for Ministry Eagle River Memorial Hospital and program director for the new simulation center. “Our family of simulators will imitate real-life situations of adult, infant and pediatric patients which is crucial for experiential learning.”

The female simulator, or “mom” of the family, is set up to give birth to an infant and can be programmed to mimic complications that can arise during labor. The infant and pediatric simulators provide an opportunity for clinicians to assess and treat mannequins that are programmed to respond just as an infant or small child would both in cases of illness and health. All of the simulators are life size, which provides another element of reality for clinicians.

Use of simulation as part of education for clinicians provides a safe environment to asses and treat a “patient” in a variety of situations from starting an IV to complex, critical situations that require emergent intervention. Clinicians using the simulators can build and sharpen skills, while learning from mistakes in a safe way, to help make the care of actual patients in our hospitals safer.

“We are very fortunate to have strong support from the communities we serve to acquire technology like this,” stated Sheila Clough hospital President. “Our rural hospitals continue to see patients of all ages who are very ill and the simulators will help our clinicians master skills that will ultimately improve the care we provide.”

 
 
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