Western Wisconsin

Health News from Western Wisconsin

Herbs are nature’s flavorful medicine
Ministry Our Lady of Victory Hospital offers expanded services
  Aron Adkins, MD
  Carol Sue Carlson, MD
New procedure performed by Joint Heart Care team
Kolor for Kids Fun Fest

 

Herbs are nature’s flavorful medicine

"Growing your own herbs can be easy and fun," said Betsy Wacker, PA-C, a master herbalist and physician assistant with specialized training in complementary medicine at Ministry Medical Group in Stanley.

In addition to using fresh herbs in cooking to enhance the flavor of foods, many common herbs also have medicinal properties and can relieve common health complaints.

Why parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme are herbs to sing about

Easy-to-grow parsley is not just a nice plate decoration. Eating parsley in salads, soups, stuffings and dips give you antioxidants that may prevent cancer. Parsley’s high vitamin C content also may bolster your immune system, reduce symptoms of arthritis, prevent strokes, diabetes and asthma. It is well documented that parsley can freshen your breath and can aid digestion. Parsley tea on a cloth also may reduce eye swelling.

Grow some fresh sage to relieve the irritation of bug bites this summer. Simply chew one leaf and place the chewed leaf directly onto the bite. Sage also tastes great with poultry; dried it is often used in stuffing.

Though rosemary is hard to start from seed, you can readily buy established plants. Rosemary is great for grilling and lends a robust flavor. Rosemary also relieves bad breath.

Everyone should have more thyme in their lives. Thyme not only spices up meat dishes, soups and stews and tomato-based sauces, it also has many medicinal qualities. Thyme is an antiviral, anti-fungal and antibacterial herb.

When 1 tablespoon of fresh (1 teaspoon dried) thyme is steeped in 1 cup of hot water for 10 minutes, you have a tea that helps bronchitis and headaches; a gargle for sore throats, or the tea can be used topically for wounds and sore muscles. You can also treat athlete’s foot by mixing one handful of fresh thyme with 2-1/2 cups of boiling water. Cover and remove from heat and steep about 25 minutes, strain and soak feet in this solution while it is still somewhat hot.

We use many of these herbs every day on pizza, in dips, on meat and in soups. Some of the names will be familiar and some may be new tastes to try.

Basil may relieve nausea and headache.

Lemon balm may relieve anxiety.

Chives’ anti-inflammatory properties are used medicinally to fight some cancers and relieve sinus headache and congestion.

Marjoram can aid digestion and be used as a sedative; it also helps reduce high blood pressure and irritable bowel syndrome.

Read more about medicinal herbs in Healing Herbs by Betsy Wacker, PA-C.

[Top]

Ministry Our Lady of Victory Hospital offers expanded services

Endocrinology services are now available at Ministry Our Lady of Victory Hospital in Stanley.

Aron Adkins, MD, an endocrinologist with the Eau Claire Medical Clinic, is now seeing patients at Ministry Our Lady of Victory Hospital. As a visiting specialist, he provides endocrinology services in Stanley on Tuesdays and Fridays. Dr. Adkins treats many conditions, including:


Aron Adkins, MD

Dr. Adkins received his medical degree from the Medical College of Ohio in Toledo. He completed his residency and a fellowship at Mayo Graduate School of Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota. He is board-certified in endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism.

To make an appointment, ask for a referral from your primary health care provider or call 715.586.8009.

Pain management services are available at Ministry Our Lady of Victory Hospital in Stanley

Ministry Our Lady of Victory Hospital is pleased to announce that Carol Sue Carlson, MD, has joined the medical staff.


Carol Sue Carlson, MD
Dr. Carlson is a member of the Chippewa Valley Orthopedics and Sports Medicine group based in Chippewa Falls. In May 2013, Dr. Carlson started seeing patients in Stanley on Wednesdays.

Dr. Carlson specializes in interventional pain management and electrodiagnostic medicine, and can help patients with various types of problems, including:

Dr. Carlson received her medical degree from Albany Medical College in Albany, New York, and she completed her residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation at Albany Medical Center. She completed a fellowship in interventional pain management at Champlain Spine and Pain Management in Plattsburgh, New York. She is board certified in physical medicine and rehabilitation and in electrodiagnostic medicine. She will be providing pain procedures and EMG studies on site at Ministry Our Lady of Victory Hospital.

To make a pain management appointment, ask for a referral from your primary health care provider or call 800.322.1748.

[Top]

New procedure performed by Joint Heart Care team

The Joint Heart Care Team of Marshfield Clinic and Ministry Health Care have performed the groundbreaking new LARIAT procedure on two patients at risk for stroke. Both patients were discharged from Ministry Saint Joseph’s Hospital in Marshfield on Feb. 9, 2013.

The procedure reduces the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation who are unable to take blood thinning medications. The Joint Heart Care Team is just the second in the state to perform this procedure; the first was done in Milwaukee.

"Patients who have atrial fibrillation have an abnormal heart beat, it is either too fast or too slow," said Milind Shah, MD, Marshfield Clinic cardiologist on staff at Ministry Saint Joseph’s Hospital. "When this happens, it’s harder for the heart’s upper and lower chambers to work together, leading to an increased likelihood that blood will pool and dangerous clots will form."

The innovative, minimally invasive procedure uses the newly FDA-approved LARIAT Suture Delivery Device, manufactured by SentreHeart Inc., to tie off the heart’s left atrial appendage (LAA). The LAA is a finger-shaped pocket attached to the left upper chamber of the heart. Between 90 and 92 percent of strokes that occur due to blood clots in atrial fibrillation patients are from clots formed in the LAA.

Dr. Shah was joined by Juan Mesa, MD, Marshfield Clinic cardiologist on staff at Ministry Saint Joseph’s Hospital, Charles McCauley, MD Marshfield Clinic echo-cardiologist on staff at Ministry Saint Joseph’s Hospital, and a team of Marshfield Clinic and Ministry Health Care staff, including echo-cardiology & electrophysiology, in performing the two procedures in the Catheterization Lab at Ministry Saint Joseph’s Hospital in Marshfield.

"The LARIAT procedure blocks stroke-causing blood clots from traveling to the brain," Dr. Mesa said. "Patients with atrial fibrillation are five times more likely to have a stroke, so this new therapy is a potential lifesaver for them."

The Marshfield Clinic and Ministry Health Care heart care team

The Marshfield Clinic and Ministry Health Care heart care team is a cooperative effort by two leading health care organizations working together as a single heart care program. For over 90 years, this has enabled the team to deliver the very highest level of care available in the region. It is the heart care team chosen more often than any other local program, treating the most complex cases and conducting more research into leading-edge heart care treatments. These top heart specialists see patients at over a dozen locations throughout north central Wisconsin and staff advanced care and surgical centers in Marshfield and Weston. For more information, visit: oneheartcareteam.org.

[Top]

Kolor for Kids Fun Fest

Attention walkers, joggers and runners of all ages, sizes, speeds and shapes

Join us for the 2013
Kolor for Kids 5K Fun Run
Pancake Breakfast & Music Fest

Saturday, August 24
Running rain or shine
6 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Grand Rapids Lions Club, Wisconsin Rapids

Register by August 1 – $30 per person or $25 per person for teams of four or more

Register after August 1 – $35 per person or $30 per person for teams of four or more
Kids 1 & under – Free

Start by wearing a spotless white shirt and end up looking like a rainbow after being blitzed with colored cornstarch powder along the route. T-shirts will be available for $10 at the Registration Area.

For more information contact: Patti Shafto-Carlson at cmn@ministryhealth.org or at www.cmnwi.org or call 715.387.9965 or 800.428.5000.

[Top]

 
 
Ministry's Latest Social Activities
Facebook Twitter