Medicine Dosage

 

Tips on giving Children’s and Junior Strength Acetaminophen (Tempra®, Tylenol®, Panadol®) correctly:

  • Consult your pediatrician’s office before giving to infants under 3 months.
  • Know your child’s weight. Many children’s medicines are dosed by weight and age, which will change as your child grows.
  • In 2011, the makers of these medicines made changes to single-ingredient liquid infant’s and children’s acetaminophen to make it easier for parents and care givers to use these medicines and to reduce potential medication errors. With these changes, all pediatric liquid acetaminophen – infant’s and children’s – is one strength.
    • To recognize the new (unconcentrated) version of infant acetaminophen, look for the syringe (not a dropper) dosing device and for this concentration on the bottle: 160 mg/5 ml.
    • To recognize the old (concentrated) version of infant acetaminophen, look for a dropper top and for this concentration on the bottle: 80 mg/0.8 ml.
    • The concentration of children’s acetaminophen (age 2 and up) did not change, but the packaging and measuring cup have been streamlined for easy, convenient use.
    • All dosing devices for all products will have uniform measurement markings, with the preferred unit of measurement being milliliters (ml).
  • Read the package instructions carefully. Not all medicines should be given at the same hourly intervals or in the same amount.
  • Follow the package instructions and give the full amount that is needed for your child.
  • Always use the measuring device that comes with the medicine. Other items like kitchen teaspoons may not be accurate. Never use spoons, droppers or cups that come with other medicines.
  • Don’t give medicine to a baby who is lying down; this could cause choking.
  • Write down the time and amount of each dose given.
  • Can be given every 4 hours.

 

Tips on giving Children’s and Junior Strength Ibuprofen (Advil® and Motrin®) correctly:

  • This is for use in infants and children 6 months of age and older.
  • Know your child’s weight. Many Children’s medicines are dosed by weight and age, which will change as your child grows.
  • Follow the packaged instructions and give the full amount that is needed for your child.
  • Always use the dropper, dosage, cup, or other measuring device that comes with the medicine. Other items like kitchen teaspoons may not be accurate. Never use spoons, droppers or cups that come with other medicines.
  • Don’t give medicine to a baby who is lying down; this could cause choking.
  • Write down the time and amount of each dose given.
  • Can be given every 6 hours.

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